June 2017 Prosperity at Work E-Tip

Economics & Job Creation:

“THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION — May 2017”

Life Sciences:
“Delayed food introduction increases risk of sensitization, study finds”

Technology:
“‘Companies Are Ill Prepared for Digital Transformation”

Healthcare:
“How class of drugs blocks Hepatitis C virus replication”

The Industrials:
“12 habits of genuine people”

Human Capital Solutions, Inc. (HCS) www.humancs.com is a Retained Executive Search and Professional Recruiting firm focused in Healthcare, Life Sciences, the Industrials, and Technology. Visit our LinkedIn Company Page to learn more about HCS and receive weekly updates.

HCS has created the Prosperity at Work proposition which focuses on creating prosperous relationships between companies and their employees (associates). HCS assists companies in improving bottom line profitability by efficiently planning, organizing and implementing optimized, practical and value-added business solutions.


 

Economics & Job Creation:

THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION — MAY 2017
Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 138,000 in May, and the unemployment
rate was little changed at 4.3 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported
today. Job gains occurred in health care and mining.

Household Survey Data

The unemployment rate, at 4.3 percent, and the number of unemployed persons, at 6.9
million, changed little in May. Since January, the unemployment rate has declined by
0.5 percentage point, and the number of unemployed has decreased by 774,000. (See
table A-1.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rate for Whites edged down to 3.7
percent in May. The jobless rates for Blacks (7.5 percent), Asians (3.6 percent),
and Hispanics (5.2 percent), as well as those for adult men (3.8 percent), adult
women (4.0 percent), and teenagers (14.3 percent), showed little or no change.
(See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)

Among the unemployed, the number of job losers and persons who completed temporary
jobs declined by 211,000 to 3.3 million in May. The number of long-term unemployed
(those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was essentially unchanged over the month at
1.7 million and accounted for 24.0 percent of the unemployed. (See tables A-11 and
A-12.)

The labor force participation rate declined by 0.2 percentage point to 62.7 percent
in May but has shown no clear trend over the past 12 months. The employment-population
ratio edged down to 60.0 percent in May. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred
to as involuntary part-time workers) was little changed at 5.2 million in May. These
individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were working part time
because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time
job. (See table A-8.)

In May, 1.5 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, down by 238,000
from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were
not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job
sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had
not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 355,000 discouraged workers in May, down by
183,000 from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged
workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are
available for them. The remaining 1.1 million persons marginally attached to the labor
force in May had not searched for work for reasons such as school attendance or family
responsibilities. (See table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 138,000 in May, compared with an average
monthly gain of 181,000 over the prior 12 months. In May, job gains occurred in health
care and mining. (See table B-1.)

Employment in health care rose by 24,000 in May. Hospitals added 7,000 jobs over the
month, and employment in ambulatory health care services continued to trend up (+13,000).
Job growth in health care has averaged 22,000 per month thus far in 2017, compared with
an average monthly gain of 32,000 in 2016.

Mining added 7,000 jobs in May. Employment in mining has risen by 47,000 since reaching
a recent low point in October 2016, with most of the gain in support activities for mining.

In May, employment in professional and business services continued to trend up (+38,000).
The industry has added an average of 46,000 jobs per month thus far this year, in line
with the average monthly job gain in 2016.

Employment in food services and drinking places also continued to trend up in May (+30,000)
and has grown by 267,000 over the past 12 months.

Employment in other major industries, including construction, manufacturing, wholesale
trade, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, information, financial activities,
and government, showed little change over the month.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls was unchanged at 34.4
hours in May. In manufacturing, the workweek also was unchanged at 40.7 hours, while
overtime edged up by 0.1 hour to 3.3 hours. The average workweek for production and
nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged down by 0.1 hour to 33.6 hours.
(See tables B-2 and B-7.)

In May, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by 4
cents to $26.22. Over the year, average hourly earnings have risen by 63 cents, or 2.5
percent. In May, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory
employees increased by 3 cents to $22.00. (See tables B-3 and B-8.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for March was revised down from +79,000
to +50,000, and the change for April was revised down from +211,000 to +174,000. With
these revisions, employment gains in March and April combined were 66,000 less than
previously reported. Monthly revisions result from additional reports received from
businesses and government agencies since the last published estimates and from the
recalculation of seasonal factors. Over the past 3 months, job gains have averaged
121,000 per month.

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm

 

Life Sciences:

“Delayed food introduction increases risk of sensitization, study finds”

Delaying the introduction of potentially allergenic foods until after a baby’s first year may increase the likelihood of a food allergy later on, according to new findings from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study.

The research, published in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, found that infants who avoided cow’s milk products, egg and peanut during the first year of life were more likely to be sensitized to these foods at age one.

“Food sensitization early in life is associated with an increased risk of wheeze, asthma, eczema and allergic rhinitis in later childhood,” said Dr. Malcolm Sears, co-director of the CHILD Study and a professor of medicine at McMaster University.

“While not all food-sensitized infants become food allergic, sensitization is an important step on the pathway,” he added. Sears is also a researcher at the Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton.

Using data from more than 2,100 Canadian children, the researchers found that infants who avoided cow’s milk products in their first year were nearly four times as likely to be sensitized to cow’s milk compared to infants who consumed cow’s milk products before 12 months of age. Similarly, infants who avoided egg or peanut in their first year were nearly twice as likely to be sensitized to those foods compared to infants who consumed them before 12 months of age.

“Early introduction of eggs before one year of age seemed to be especially beneficial, as it significantly reduced the odds of developing sensitization to any of the three food allergens,” says the study’s first author, Maxwell Tran, a BHSc graduate from McMaster University and an AllerGen trainee.

“To our knowledge, this is the first observational study in a general population of infants to report on how the timing of introduction of multiple foods affects the risk of developing a food allergy.”

The study also revealed that most Canadian parents delay the introduction of potentially allergenic foods, particularly egg and peanut: only three per cent of parents introduced egg before six months of age, while just one per cent of parents introduced peanut to their infants before six months of age and 63% of parents avoided feeding peanut entirely during the first year of life.

“Our findings support infant feeding guidelines that promote the introduction of foods such as cow’s milk products, egg and peanut between four to six months of age,” says Mr. Tran. “This is an important shift in thinking away from avoidance of potentially allergenic foods, toward their early introduction to reduce the risk of food allergy later on.”

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170608123531.htm

 

Technology:

“Companies Are Ill Prepared for Digital Transformation”

Driven by the ongoing digital revolution as well as demographic, political and social forces, almost 90 percent of HR and business leaders rate building the organization of the future as their top priority. In its 2017 Global Human Capital Trends report, ‘Rewriting the Rules for the Digital Age,’ Deloitte issues a call-to-action for companies to reconsider their organizational structure, talent and HR strategies to keep pace with digital disruption.

“Technology is advancing at an unprecedented rate and these innovations have completely transformed the way we live, work and communicate,” said Josh Bersin, principal and founder, Bersin by Deloitte, Deloitte Consulting LLP. “Ultimately, the digital world of work has changed the rules of business. Organizations should shift their entire mindset and behaviors to ensure they can lead, organize, motivate, manage and engage the 21st century workforce, or risk being left behind.”

With more than 10,000 HR and business leaders in 140 countries weighing in, the study revealed that leaders are turning to new organization models, which highlight the networked nature of today’s world of work. Because business productivity often fails to keep pace with technological progress, however, Deloitte found that HR is struggling to keep up: Only 35 percent of HR professionals rated their capabilities as ‘good’ or ‘excellent.’

“As technology, artificial intelligence, and robotics transform business models and work, companies should start to rethink their management practices and organizational models,” said Brett Walsh, global human capital leader, Deloitte Global. “The future of work is driving the development of a set of ‘new rules’ that organizations should follow if they want to remain competitive.”

Building the Organization of the Future

As the workforce evolves, organizations are focusing on networks of teams, and recruiting and developing the right people is more consequential than ever. Survey respondents said talent acquisition is one of the biggest issues organizations face, with 81 percent of companies citing it as ‘very important’ or ‘important.’

While Deloitte found that cognitive technologies have helped leaders bring talent acquisition into the digital world, only 22 percent of survey respondents describe their companies as ‘excellent’ at building a differentiated employee experience once talent is acquired. The gap between talent acquisition’s importance and the ability to meet the need, in fact, increased by 14 percentage points over the last year.

It is critical to take an integrated approach to building the employee experience. A large part of it centers on ‘careers and learning,’ which rose to second place on HRs’ and business leaders’ priority lists. Eighty-three percent of those surveyed ranked it as ‘important’ or ‘very important.’ Deloitte found that as organizations shed legacy systems and dismantle yesterday’s hierarchies, it is important to place a higher premium on implementing immersive learning experiences to develop leaders who can thrive in today’s digital world and appeal to diverse workforce needs.

The importance of leadership as a driver of the employee experience remains strong, as the percentage of companies with experiential programs for leaders rose nearly 20 percentage points from 47 percent previously to 64 percent this past year. Deloitte said a crucial need remains, however, for stronger and different types of leaders, particularly as today’s business world seeks those who demonstrate more agile and digital capabilities.

Capitalizing On Digital HR for a 21st Century Workforce

As organizations become more digital, leaders should consider disruptive technologies for every aspect of their human capital needs. Deloitte found that 56 percent of companies are redesigning their HR programs to leverage digital and mobile tools, and 33 percent are already using some form of artificial intelligence applications to deliver HR solutions.

“HR and other business leaders tell us that they are being asked to create a digital workplace in order to become an ‘organization of the future,’” said Erica Volini, principal, Deloitte Consulting, and national managing director of the U.S. human capital practice. “To rewrite the rules on a broad scale, HR should play a leading role in helping the company redesign the organization by bringing digital technologies to both the workforce and to the HR organization itself.”

Deloitte found that the HR function is in the midst of a wide-ranging identity shift. To effectively position itself as a key business advisor to the organization, HR must focus on service delivery efficiency and excellence in talent programs, as well as on the entire design of work using a digital lens.

Jobs Being Reinvented

The trends in this year’s report showed signs of reinvention on all fronts, including jobs themselves. Organizations should approach external talent, robotics, cognitive tools and AI systems as the “new, augmented workforce,” the report said. This year, 41 percent of respondents reported having fully implemented or having made significant progress in adopting cognitive and AI technologies within their workforce. But only 17 percent of global executives said they are ready to manage a workforce with people, robots and AI working side by side — the lowest readiness level for a trend in the five years of the Global Human Capital Trends survey.

While many jobs are being reinvented through technology and some tasks are being automated, Deloitte’s research showed that the essentially human aspects of work – such as empathy, communication, and problem solving – are becoming more important than ever.

This shift is not only driving an increased focus on reskilling, but also on the importance of people analytics to help organizations gain even greater insights into the capabilities of their workforce on a global scale. Organizations continue to fall short in this area, however, with only eight percent reporting they have usable data, and only nine percent believing they have a good understanding of the talent factors that drive performance in this new world of work.

“This represents one of the biggest opportunities for the HR organization,” said Volini. “To be able to rewrite the rules, HR needs to prove it has the insights and capabilities to successfully play outside the lines.”

Contributed by Scott A. Scanlon, Editor-in-Chief; Dale M. Zupsansky, Managing Editor; Stephen Sawicki, Managing Editor; and Chase Barbe, Managing Editor – Hunt Scanlon Media

http://huntscanlon.com/companies-ill-prepared-digital-transformation

 

Healthcare:

“How class of drugs blocks Hepatitis C virus replication”

Globally, an estimated 71 million people are living with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV). Over decades of infection, chronic HCV infection results in progressive damage to the liver and an increased risk for end stage liver disease and liver cancer, making the virus the leading cause of liver-related deaths in the United States today.

While effective combination therapies have recently been developed, HCV can evolve to become resistant to these antiviral drugs, potentially resulting in treatment failures. Resistance is particularly important for one class of medications used in treatment, for which the mechanism by which it stops growth of the virus is poorly understood. For the first time, researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have identified how the class of antiviral drugs known as NS5A inhibitors interacts with the virus, and their findings show a difference between strains of HCV. These results were published in PLOS Pathogens.

“When HCV infects a liver cell, it establishes replication complexes (RCs) within the cell,” said David McGivern, Ph.D., lead-author and an associate professor in the UNC Division of Infectious Diseases. “These may be thought of as factories that replicate the virus genetic material. We wanted to understand how long these factories persist in an infected cell after treatment with an NS5A inhibitor.”

The research team has shown previously NS5A inhibitors block the formation of new RCs, but do not affect existing RCs, which are ultimately lost from the cell during treatment. The team used NS5A inhibitors to estimate the half-life of the existing RCs and found a difference in the speed of decline depending upon the strain of HCV.

“The majority of people who undergo antiviral treatment clear their HCV infection,” said McGivern. “But about 5 percent of people experience treatment failure, often associated with drug resistance. Our findings have potentially important implications for this group of people. Did the treatment fail because replication complexes turned over more slowly? Do some strains of HCV need longer treatment? A better understanding of these issues may lead to more effective therapies active against a broader range of viruses.”

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170608202150.htm

 

The Industrials:

“12 habits of genuine people”

There’s an enormous amount of research suggesting that emotional intelligence (EQ) is critical to your performance at work. TalentSmart has tested the EQ of more than a million people and found that it explains 58% of success in all types of jobs.

People with high EQs make $29,000 more annually than people with low EQs. Ninety percent of top performers have high EQs, and a single-point increase in your EQ adds $1,300 to your salary. I could go on and on.

Suffice it to say, emotional intelligence is a powerful way to focus your energy in one direction with tremendous results.
But there’s a catch. Emotional intelligence won’t do a thing for you if you aren’t genuine.

A recent study from the Foster School of Business at the University of Washington found that people don’t accept demonstrations of emotional intelligence at face value. They’re too skeptical for that. They don’t just want to see signs of emotional intelligence. They want to know that it’s genuine — that your emotions are authentic.

According to lead researcher Christina Fong, when it comes to your coworkers: “They are not just mindless automatons. They think about the emotions they see and care whether they are sincere or manipulative.”

The same study found that sincere leaders are far more effective at motivating people because they inspire trust and admiration through their actions, not just their words. Many leaders say that authenticity is important to them, but genuine leaders walk their talk every day.

It’s not enough to just go through the motions, trying to demonstrate qualities that are associated with emotional intelligence. You have to be genuine.

You can do a gut check to find out how genuine you are by comparing your own behavior to that of people who are highly genuine. Consider the hallmarks of genuine people and see how you stack up.

“Authenticity requires a certain measure of vulnerability, transparency, and integrity,” Janet Louise Stephenson said.

1. Genuine people don’t try to make people like them
Genuine people are who they are. They know that some people will like them, and some won’t. And they’re okay with that. It’s not that they don’t care whether or not other people will like them but simply that they’re not going to let that get in the way of doing the right thing. They’re willing to make unpopular decisions and to take unpopular positions if that’s what needs to be done.

Since genuine people aren’t desperate for attention, they don’t try to show off. They know that when they speak in a friendly, confident, and concise manner, people are much more attentive to and interested in what they have to say than if they try to show that they’re important. People catch on to your attitude quickly and are more attracted to the right attitude than what or how many people you know.

2. They don’t pass judgment
Genuine people are open-minded, which makes them approachable and interesting to others. No one wants to have a conversation with someone who has already formed an opinion and is not willing to listen.

Having an open mind is crucial in the workplace, as approachability means access to new ideas and help. To eliminate preconceived notions and judgment, you need to see the world through other people’s eyes.

This doesn’t require you to believe what they believe or condone their behavior; it simply means you quit passing judgment long enough to truly understand what makes them tick. Only then can you let them be who they are.

3. They forge their own paths
Genuine people don’t derive their sense of pleasure and satisfaction from the opinions of others. This frees them up to follow their own internal compasses. They know who they are and don’t pretend to be anything else. Their direction comes from within, from their own principles and values. They do what they believe to be the right thing, and they’re not swayed by the fact that somebody might not like it.

4. They are generous
We’ve all worked with people who constantly hold something back, whether it’s knowledge or resources. They act as if they’re afraid you’ll outshine them if they give you access to everything you need to do your job. Genuine people are unfailingly generous with whom they know, what they know, and the resources they have access to.

They want you to do well more than anything else because they’re team players and they’re confident enough to never worry that your success might make them look bad. In fact, they believe that your success is their success.

5. They treat EVERYONE with respect
Whether interacting with their biggest clients or servers taking their drink orders, genuine people are unfailingly polite and respectful. They understand that no matter how nice they are to the people they have lunch with, it’s all for naught if those people witnesses them behaving badly toward others.

Genuine people treat everyone with respect because they believe they’re no better than anyone else.

6. They aren’t motivated by material things
Genuine people don’t need shiny, fancy stuff in order to feel good. It’s not that they think it’s wrong to go out and buy the latest and greatest items to show off their status; they just don’t need to do this to be happy. Their happiness comes from within, as well as from the simpler pleasures—such as friends, family, and a sense of purpose—that make life rich.

7. They are trustworthy
People gravitate toward those who are genuine because they know they can trust them. It is difficult to like someone when you don’t know who they really are and how they really feel. Genuine people mean what they say, and if they make a commitment, they keep it.

You’ll never hear a truly genuine person say, “Oh, I just said that to make the meeting end faster.” You know that if they say something, it’s because they believe it to be true.

8. They are thick-skinned
Genuine people have a strong enough sense of self that they don’t go around seeing offense that isn’t there. If somebody criticizes one of their ideas, they don’t treat this as a personal attack. There’s no need for them to jump to conclusions, feel insulted, and start plotting their revenge.

They’re able to objectively evaluate negative and constructive feedback, accept what works, put it into practice, and leave the rest of it behind without developing hard feelings.

9. They put away their phones
Nothing turns someone off to you like a mid-conversation text message or even a quick glance at your phone. When genuine people commit to a conversation, they focus all of their energy on the conversation. You will find that conversations are more enjoyable and effective when you immerse yourself in them. When you robotically approach people with small talk and are tethered to your phone, this puts their brains on autopilot and prevents them from having any real affinity for you.

Genuine people create connection and find depth even in short, everyday conversations. Their genuine interest in other people makes it easy for them to ask good questions and relate what they’re told to other important facets of the speaker’s life.

10. They aren’t driven by ego
Genuine people don’t make decisions based on their egos because they don’t need the admiration of others in order to feel good about themselves. Likewise, they don’t seek the limelight or try to take credit for other people’s accomplishments. They simply do what needs to be done without saying, “Hey, look at me!”

11. They aren’t hypocrites
Genuine people practice what they preach. They don’t tell you to do one thing and then do the opposite themselves. That’s largely due to their self-awareness. Many hypocrites don’t even recognize their mistakes. They’re blind to their own weaknesses. Genuine people, on the other hand, fix their own problems first.

12. They don’t brag
We’ve all worked with people who can’t stop talking about themselves and their accomplishments. Have you ever wondered why? They boast and brag because they’re insecure and worried that if they don’t point out their accomplishments, no one will notice.

Genuine people don’t need to brag. They’re confident in their accomplishments, but they also realize that when you truly do something that matters, it stands on its own merits, regardless of how many people notice or appreciate it.

Bringing it all together
Genuine people know who they are. They are confident enough to be comfortable in their own skin. They are firmly grounded in reality, and they’re truly present in each moment because they’re not trying to figure out someone else’s agenda or worrying about their own.

https://www.theladders.com/p/20399/genuine-people

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